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Maker of the Month – Claire Lehmann

Claire Lehmann is a graphic artist and ceramicist who studied art history and multimedia and is now exploring the industrial design of ceramics. She is influenced by architecture, sci-fi and 1970s interior design. Her work reflects her interests in shape, texture, process and weight.

We are looking forward to the reveal of Claire’s most recent work in a joint exhibition with Georgie Moyes entitled 573° this month at Guild of Objects from November 17–19.

Please come help us celebrate the launch of Claire and Georgie’s exhibition at a special preview on Thursday November 17 from 5–8pm.

Can you please tell us a little about yourself and your craft?

I’m 38, I live in Northcote and I alternate between ceramics and freelance work as a graphic artist/retoucher. I’m in my last month of studying a Diploma of Ceramics at Holmesglen Tafe. I previously studied a Bachelor of Art History and then Multimedia. I’ve always made art, but cut back when I started working in design. So after 13 years in front of a computer I’m finally circling back around – older, slightly wiser and definitely better at Photoshop. I have a studio in North Melbourne and have been making ceramics for six years. My focus was initially on tableware, but now my focus is shifting towards lighting and hopefully more sculptural, non-functional ceramics.

When and how did you first get interested in ceramics?

One of my sisters asked me to do a short course with her at Carlton Arts Centre. I turned up and within six months I’d moved to part-time work so I could spend the rest of my time making ceramics. It was a convergence of my love of homewares, using my hands and a challenge.

Can you describe the early days of setting up your business?

Initially, it was all about repetition and learning from lots and lots of mistakes. I’d take orders and figure things out as I went. I’d stick to shapes and colours I knew I could manage and I was definitely being risk-averse. Studying ceramics has been great because I’ve tried things I wouldn’t have attempted otherwise and that’s definitely opened up my practice and my interests. I named my business Sunday Ceramics after Sunday Reed who is a personal hero (and was a mega babe). I think my interest in opacity, weight, structure and material tolerance ties in with my love of design. In another life, I would have studied industrial design but I think I’m glad I didn’t. I kind of enjoy approaching these areas with no knowledge and no set ideas. Things just happen organically. And when a shape doesn’t work, I problem solve – do I change the design or do I change the process? The problem solving keeps it interesting.

What does a typical day look like for you?

On pottery days I wake up, have a nice breakfast, do life admin and get to the studio around 10:30am. I like to have different projects going at the same time and I move between them. Usually there are chats and coffees with other studio people, some Radio National and history podcasts, and then suddenly it gets dark and it’s pens down, the day is over. I guess I go into the zone for 5–6 hours and when I come back hopefully some nice ceramics have been made.



Where/what do you draw inspiration from?

I’m interested in shape and texture and I draw inspiration from architecture, art and design. I also love collecting interior design books from the 1970s and 80s.

If you could do anything tomorrow what would you do?

I’d go to the beach and read a book and try to forget about my to-do list.

If you could teach your kids one thing, what would it be?

I try to teach my nieces and nephews to be kind and to have fun.

What are you reading at the moment?

Longform. Always. When I’m on holiday I read books, but in the meantime it’s all about longform journalism.

If we rummaged through your grocery bag, what would we find?

The usual stuff – vegetables, cheese, but also maybe a screwdriver or some random pottery tools.

Can you tell us the first thing that pops into your mind when we mention the word …

Breakfast: slow scramble
Weekends: studio time
People: smiles with friends
Pause: never
Sound: rain
Smell: my lover’s hair
Place: my garden
Texture: hands
Ritual: ceramics
Color: white

What’s one thing you can’t live without at the moment?

The supportive and creative people around me.

What are your words of wisdom?

Life wisdom: Be kind. Try to listen. Trust that it’s all going in the right direction. Ceramic-specific wisdom: Even if things fail, put them in the bin, learn and move on. Aka let it go.

573° Exhibition Open Hours:

Launch Night | Thursday November 17 5–8pm

Open Friday November 18 and Saturday November 19 from 10am to 5pm. 

 

Find Claire on Instagram and online.

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Maker of the Month – Georgie Moyes

Georgie Moyes is a Melbourne-based ceramicist, utilising hand-building techniques and the wheel to make pieces inspired by the natural world. Harmony and balance are at the forefront of her work as she makes larger pieces which challenge ideas of function and purpose.

We are so excited to be showing Georgie’s work in a joint exhibition with Claire Lehmann entitled 573° this month at Guild of Objects from November 17–19.

Please come help us celebrate the launch of Georgie and Claire’s exhibition at a special preview on Thursday November 17 from 5–8pm.

 

Can you please tell us a little about yourself and your craft?

I live in Coburg, which isn’t too far from my studio in North Melbourne where I practise ceramics. I feel lucky to say that I spent my earlier years growing up in Warrandyte on a large property with farmland and creeks nearby. I always spent a lot of time outdoors in the garden searching for blue tongues and absorbing as much of my mum’s knowledge about plants as I could! After finishing high school, I started studying psychology but realised it wasn’t for me and decided to take some time out to travel. When I came back I did some short courses in dressmaking and sewing, and I then started taking ceramics classes at Carlton Arts Centre and my interest in clay just kept evolving. Now I am finishing my Diploma of Ceramics at Holmesglen Tafe.  

When and how did you first get interested in ceramics? 

I guess it’s really been embedded in me and something I’ve appreciated for a long time. My mum and my uncle have such an eye for one-off pieces and beautiful antiques. When I visit my mum’s house now, I spend ages looking through all of her knick knacks and the precious things she’s collected over the years – a lot of which are ceramics! My uncle has always given me the most incredible gifts. Everything has always felt like a treasure from another land! So I’ve always had a great appreciation for ceramics and handmade things. My gran also used to make ceramics at Potters Cottage in Warrandyte and she still has a number of the beautiful pieces she made with glazes she formulated herself. So naturally my mother enrolled me in weekend ceramic classes around the age of 11.



Can you describe the early days of setting up your business?

I initially started taking throwing classes at Carlton Arts Centre. I loved these classes, because I was just happy to be making something with my hands. I wasn’t doing it for an outcome, it was just to play and be immersed in something new. Though I soon realised ceramics can’t just be a casual affair, it demands attention and perseverance. I became obsessed with the process, and how much you really have to nurture your work if you want it to make it. It was all a lesson in patience and practising non-attachment. I was going 3-4 times a week, but I wanted more. I needed to know more about hand-building and glazes, which lead me look into Holmesglen. At the moment I’m trying less to focus on the outcome – whether a piece will be functional, where I imagine it to be placed or how it fits into the world, and instead to just feel it out and be open to things changing along the way. Since the start of the year, I’ve been lucky enough to gain a studio space with other potters and shared equipment, which has been amazing! It’s so good to be surrounded by people who are using the same medium but in so many varied ways.

What does a typical day look like for you? 

At the moment I can’t go a day without yoga, and I can’t go a day without time in my garden. These two things are crucial to my productivity and joy. Usually I’m up and in the garden by 8am and at the studio by 10am – coffee in hand and listening to PBS Radio. I’ll usually sit around on Instagram for a while and then go over what I did the day before, and plan what to do for the day. I’m currently building a lot of larger vessels. Usually around 3pm, Claire (my studio wife) and I have a brie and cheddar break, then we’ll get a second wind for a few more hours or it’s time to head home. After a day at the studio I head to yoga, and then it’s home to slay all the snails and slugs in the veggie garden.

Where/what do you draw inspiration from?

Mainly island life, tropical living, tropical plants, tropical animals, tropical beauties, tropical feelings. My happiness is heavily synced with how much time I spend around nature, so I draw a lot of inspiration from the natural world and living within our means alongside nature. I love to look back in time at how ancient cultures used ceramics in ritual and offerings.

The value and worth placed upon objects and belongings inspires me to make. I love how simple things like a stone or seed can resonate with me so much, so I try to make things with this in mind, that everything is special. But there are a number of artists who really inspire me – Maria Gazzard is one with her beautiful forms, as well as paintings by Paul Gauguin. Also the ceramic works of Salvatore Fiume – so dreamy! And the forms of Ancient Grecian urns and all the treasures from the Aegean Sea.

If you could do anything tomorrow what would you do?

As disgusting as it sounds, I’d probably elope to an island in the Caribbean with my boyfriend. 

If you could teach your kids one thing, what would it be?

How to grow food!

What are you reading at the moment?

Island by Aldous Huxley, and my god it’s good!

If we rummaged through your grocery bag, what would we find?

Bonsoy, Derry-O organic brie, liquorice, sweet potato (ALWAYS), tahini, dates and vermicelli.

Can you tell us the first thing that pops into your mind when we mention the word …

Breakfast: coffeeee!
Weekends: garden
People: rather not
Pause: breathe
Sound: rain
Smell: rice
Place: bed
Texture: sand
Ritual: ceramic
Colour: green  

What’s one thing you can’t live without at the moment? 

Yoga.

What are your words of wisdom?

Trust that every little thing that happens (good or bad) is leading you to where you want to be. 

573° Exhibition Open Hours:

Launch Night | Thursday November 17 from 5–8pm

Open Friday November 18 and Saturday November 19 from 10am to 5pm.

 

Find Georgie on Instagram.

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Spring has sprung!

The sky is bluer, the air is sweet with the scent of new blooms and the sun is casting warmer rays upon our corner of the world ...

Spring is here!

In-store that means we're all PLANTS and excellent PLANTERS to cuddle the precious roots of our leafy friends.   

pretty pastels

For this week's edit, we've taken cues from the new season's delivery of all things sugary sweet and floral – the sherbet hues of Niamh Minogue's bowls and Tessy King's boxes, the fairy floss pink of Melanie Rice's hoops, and the foliage gracing Edith Rewa's scarves.

We have lots of greenery at Guild including Ferns from $15, the popular String of Pearls, Ficus and huge air cleansing Peace Lillies for only $45. Easy care indoor plants are an affordable way to bring some Spring into your space.

To house your new 'apartment friendly pets' we've got hanging planters by Takeawei, macrame plant pods by Smalltown and just in are these big planters with bases from Alison Frith.

And if you don't carry the green-thumbed gene, you can kit out your walls with the unable-to-be-killed leafy prints from Elizabeth Barnett and Ashley Ronning.

Niamh Minogue bowl Ashley Ronning print Elise Sheehan necklace Edith Rewa scarf Melanie Rice bangle AL-MA earrings Tessy King box Bettina Willner Browne Melanie Rice earrings Two Hills rings Takeawei planter

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Moody Blues



Our Melbourne winter blues might be coming to an end, but we are still captivated by the totally gorgeous blue hues of Nomad Object Co.'s new tableware range. We have been waiting in anticipation for this collection to arrive all winter, and now that it has made it into our store we are not disappointed.

Brooke first met Lyndon Sendeckyj from Nomad Object Co. when they studied ceramics together at Holmesglen Tafe, and then went on to share a workspace together in North Melbourne at Elm Place Studios. Since then, Lyndon has moved into his own workshop in Thornbury and his ceramic practice has developed into creating unique tableware collections and exhibition pieces for which he uses a range of throwing and handbuilding techniques.
 
All pieces from Nomad Object Co.'s tableware range at Guild are made from various reclaimed clays. Pale clays are mixed together with rich, dark iron bearing clays to create unique surfaces for the deep pooling blue glaze that changes on each different clay mixture. Relish boats, tea plates, cups and bowls – no two items are the same. 
 
 
 

 
We are also very proud to be the exclusive stockist of handmade copper spoons and cheese knives by Melbourne metalsmith Kat Relish. Again, each of Kat's pieces are handmade and entirely unique, with twisted handles, flattened arrowhead details and decorative enamelling.

Paired together, the colour and texture of the ceramic tableware with the copper utensils is so rich and luscious. Perfect for chunky homemade sauces, jams and relishes, served with cheese, warm bread and hot cups of tea. 
 




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